Typescript/ES7 Decorators to make Vuex modules a breeze

Reading Time: 5 minutes

Overview

Who does not like to use Vuex in a VueJS App? I think no one 🙂

Today I would like to show you a very useful tool written in TypeScript that can boost your productivity with Vuex: vuex-module-decorators. Lately, it’s getting more popular. Below you can see the weekly downloads of the package which raise up constantly:

Weekly downloads on npmjs.com

But what does it exactly do and which benefit does it provide?

  • Typescript classes with strict type of safety
    Create modules where nothing can go wrong. The type check at compile time ensures that you cannot mutate data that is not part of the module or cannot access unavailable fields.
  • Decorators for declarative code
    Annotate your functions with @Action or @Mutation to automatically turn them into Vuex module methods.
  • Autocomplete for actions and mutations
    The shape of modules is fully typed, so you can access action and mutation functions with type-safety and get autocomplete help.

In short, with this library, you can write Vuex module in this format:

import { VuexModule, Module, Mutation, Action } from 'vuex-module-decorators'
import { get } from 'axios'

@Module
export default class Posts extends VuexModule {
    posts: PostEntity[] = [] // initialise empty for now

    get totalComments (): number {
        return posts.filter((post) => {
            // Take those posts that have comments
            return post.comments && post.comments.length
        }).reduce((sum, post) => {
            // Sum all the lengths of comments arrays
            return sum + post.comments.length
        }, 0)
    }

    @Mutation
    updatePosts(posts: PostEntity[]) {
        this.posts = posts
    }

    @Action({commit: 'updatePosts'})
    async function fetchPosts() {
        return get('https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/posts')
    }
}

As you can see, thanks to this package, we are able to write a Vuex module by writing a class which provides Mutations, Actions and Getters. Everything in one single file. How cool is that?

Benefits of type-safety

Instead of using the usual way to dispatch and commit…

store.commit('updatePosts', posts)
await store.dispatch('fetchPosts')

…with the getModule Accessor you can now use a more type-safe mechanism that does not offer type safety for the user data and no help for automatic completion in IDEs.

import { getModule } from 'vuex-module-decorators'
import Posts from `~/store/posts.js`

const postsModule = getModule(Posts)

// access posts
const posts = postsModule.posts

// use getters
const commentCount = postsModule.totalComments

// commit mutation
postsModule.updatePosts(newPostsArray)

// dispatch action
await postsModule.fetchPosts()

Core concepts

State

All properties of the class are converted into state props. For example, the following code

import { Module, VuexModule } from 'vuex-module-decorators'

@Module
export default class Vehicle extends VuexModule {
  wheels = 2
}

is equivalent to this:

export default {
  state: {
    wheels: 2
  }
}

Mutations

All functions decorated with @Mutation are converted into Vuex mutations. For example, the following code

import { Module, VuexModule, Mutation } from 'vuex-module-decorators'

@Module
export default class Vehicle extends VuexModule {
  wheels = 2

  @Mutation
  puncture(n: number) {
    this.wheels = this.wheels - n
  }
}

is equivalent to this:

export default {
  state: {
    wheels: 2
  },
  mutations: {
    puncture: (state, payload) => {
      state.wheels = state.wheels - payload
    }
  }
}

Actions

All functions that are decorated with @Action are converted into Vuex actions.

For example this code

import { Module, VuexModule, Mutation, Action } from 'vuex-module-decorators'
import { get } from 'request'

@Module
export default class Vehicle extends VuexModule {
  wheels = 2

  @Mutation
  addWheel(n: number) {
    this.wheels = this.wheels + n
  }

  @Action
  async fetchNewWheels(wheelStore: string) {
    const wheels = await get(wheelStore)
    this.context.commit('addWheel', wheels)
  }
}

is equivalent to this:

const request = require(‘request')

export default {
  state: {
    wheels: 2
  },
  mutations: {
    addWheel: (state, payload) => {
      state.wheels = state.wheels + payload
    }
  },
  actions: {
    fetchNewWheels: async (context, payload) => {
      const wheels = await request.get(payload)
      context.commit('addWheel', wheels)
    }
  }
}

Advanced concepts

Namespaced Modules

If you intend to use your module in a namespaced way, then you need to specify so in the @Module decorator:

@Module({ namespaced: true, name: 'mm' })
class MyModule extends VuexModule {
  wheels = 2

  @Mutation
  incrWheels(extra: number) {
    this.wheels += extra
  }

  get axles() {
    return this.wheels / 2
  }
}

const store = new Vuex.Store({
  modules: {
    mm: MyModule
  }
})

Registering global actions inside namespaced modules

In order to register actions of namespaced modules globally, you can add a parameter root: true to @Action and @MutationAction decorated methods:

@Module({ namespaced: true, name: 'mm' })
class MyModule extends VuexModule {
  wheels = 2

  @Mutation
  setWheels(wheels: number) {
    this.wheels = wheels
  }
  
  @Action({ root: true, commit: 'setWheels' })
  clear() {
    return 0
  }

  get axles() {
    return this.wheels / 2
  }
}

const store = new Vuex.Store({
  modules: {
    mm: MyModule
  }
})

This way the @Action clear of MyModule will be called by dispatching clear although being in the namespaced module mm. The same thing works for @MutationAction by just passing { root: true } to the decorator-options.

Dynamic Modules

Modules can be registered dynamically simply by passing a few properties into the @Module decorator, but an important part of the process is, we first create the store, and then pass the store to the module:

import store from '@/store'
import {Module, VuexModule} from 'vuex-module-decorators'

@Module({dynamic: true, store, name: 'mm'})
export default class MyModule extends VuexModule {
  /*
  Your module definition as usual
  */
}

Installation

The installation of the package is quite simple and does not require many steps:

Download the package

npm install vuex-module-decorators
# or
yarn add vuex-module-decorators

Vue configuration

// vue.config.js
module.exports = {
  // ... your other options
  transpileDependencies: [
    'vuex-module-decorators'
  ]
}

For more details, you can check the plugin’s official documentation.

Conclusion

I personally think this package can rump up your productivity because it embraces the “modularisation” pattern by making your app more scalable. Another big advantage is the fact you have “type-checking” thankfully to TypeScript. If you have a VueJS TypeScript Application, I strongly recommend you this package.

The way to the professional VueJS-Project ( Part 1 )

Reading Time: 4 minutes

Okay, it’s usually easy to start a VueJS project. There are many tutorials or Vue-Cli templates and with the Vue-Cli 3.x, it’s super easy to create your own. Here are some links:

BUT what if the requirements increase and become more demanding? Or if component/functional testing and typification are required? Or “newer” technologies such as GraphQL, serverless, state machines/diagrams and module dependency management come into play?

How to start?

We’ll start with the easiest way and use the VueCli API.

# via console
vue create professional-world
# or via the vue cli gui
vue ui

We will be prompted to pick a preset. First, select manually features.

After we select these features, we will choose the following setup.

Some points about our setup:

  • class-style
    I choose this mode to show you the TypeScript decorator for class-style Vue components. But of course, you can take the normal style it is not so many new stuff for the first time.
  • history mode
    We do not choose this router mode, because for a simpler environment setup. If you don’t like this – feel free to change this. Read more about it here.
  • css pre-processor
    You can choose whatever you want. I prefer stylus regarding the less code. 😏
  • lintner
    It makes sense to activate here TSLint and also the auto-fix on commit. But we will add husky instead of a git-hook.
  • cypress vs nightwatch
    We choose cypress because it has some nice other testing features e.g. debuggability, automatic waiting, network traffic control, spies, stubs, clocks and screenshots and videos testing. But we will pay for it with the limited browser compatibility at the moment – later we will close this gap with regression tests.
  • config placing
    I prefer to use in dedicated config files. It is easier to change and also the package.json is more readable if you add more dependencies.

Now we will add some more dependencies before we can start:

yarn add -D husky vue-cli-plugin-pug eslint-plugin-pug jest-image-snapshot
  • husky
    It makes git hooks easy
  • pug
    It’s a robust, elegant, feature-rich template engine for Node.js
  • jest-image-snapshot
    It’s a jest matcher for image comparisons. Most commonly used for visual regression testing.

Last configurations

Husky needs to add the following file.huskyrc.js (If you want you can delete the links for the git-hook in the package.json😎

module.exports = {
  "hooks": {
    "pre-commit": "lint-staged"
  }
}

For pug, we add a vue plugin and also an eslint plugin. Eslint itself needs the following configuration in tslint.json.

"plugins": [ "pug" ],

Start coding

After this configurations we can start coding ☺️ Ok we start first with refactoring the example files from the Vue-Cli template to pug syntax. You can use for this a formatter e.g. html-to-pug.com.

Extra tipp

Create a new file named .editorconfig and add following content. It helps you with keep the coding style – you do not need to worry about the format.

root = true

[*]
charset = utf-8
indent_style = space
indent_size = 2
end_of_line = lf
insert_final_newline = true
trim_trailing_whitespace = true

After this you should have this status from your project:
https://gitlab.com/47northlabs/public/a-professional-vue-world/tree/part-1

Following parts

  • Coding with typescript, stylus and pug ( Part 2 )
  • First steps with unit component, functional and e2e tests ( Part 3 )
  • Vue and VueX meets state machines ( Part 4 )
  • Apollo/GraphQL with serverless services ( Part 5 )
  • Module dependency management in VUE ( Part 6 )

FrontCon 2019 in Riga, Latvia

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Only a few weeks left until I go to my first tech conference this year. Travelling means for me learning something new. And I like learning. Especially the immersion in a foreign culture and the contact to people of other countries makes me happy.

It’s always time to grow beyond yourself. 🤓

BUT why visit Riga just for a conference? Riga is a beautiful city on the Baltic Sea and the capital of Latvia. Latvia is a small country with the neighbours: Russia, Lithuania, Estonia and the sea. AND it’s a childhood dream of me to get to know this city. 😍

The dream was created by an old computer game named “The Patrician”. It’s a historical trading simulation computer game and my brothers and I loved it. We lost a lot of hours to play it instead of finding a way to hack it. 😅
For this dream, I will take some extra private days to visit Riga and the Country as well. 😇

Preparation

The most important preparation such as flight, hotel, workshop and conference are completed.

Furthermore, I also plan to visit some of the famous Latvian palaces and the Medieval Castle of Riga. I also need some tips for the evenings: restaurants and sightseeings from you. Feel free to share them in the comments. 😊

Some facts about the conference

There are four workshops available on the first day:

  • Serverless apps development for frontend developers
  • Vue state management with vuex
  • From Zero to App: A React Workshop
  • Advanced React Workshop

I chose the workshop with VueJS of course 😏 and I’m really happy to see that I can visit most of the talks in the following days. There are some interesting speeches like “Building resilient frontend architecture”, “AAA 3D graphics” and secure talks and server-less frontend development. Click here for the full list of tracks.

My expectations

Above all, I’m open to events to learn new things. Therefore, I have no great expectations in advance. So I’m looking forward to the

  • VueJS & Reacts parts
  • Visit the speakers from Wix, N26 and SumUp

I’m particularly curious about the open spaces between the speeches. I will be glad to have some great talks with the guys. 🤩

For my private trips:

That’s all for now

to be continued…